COURT DOCUMENTS: George Floyd Profile Reads Like A Career Criminal

By

| Last modified on June 12th, 2020 at 12:10 pm,

The unfortunate death of George Floyd which sparked a Civil War like atmosphere in America has now snowballed into worldwide protests. All four officers involved have now been suspended, arrested and charged. Floyd had moved to Minneapolis after being released from Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest. He went to jail for atleast 5 times and a look at George Floyd’s profile as per court documents reads like a career criminal involved in drug abuse, theft, criminal trespassing, aggravated robbery as well as entering a woman’s home and pointing a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs and money.

Court Documents George Floyd Profile Reads Like A Career Criminal
Court Documents George Floyd Profile Reads Like A Career Criminal

The official autopsy found Floyd died of cardiac arrest caused by being restrained. However, at the time of his death, he was under the influence of fentanyl and had methamphetamine in his system. A second autopsy, commissioned by Floyd’s family, found that the “evidence is consistent with mechanical asphyxia as the cause” of death, with neck compression restricting blood flow to the brain, and back compression restricting breathing. The cause of his death is still disputed.

George Floyd’s Criminal Past

  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998

According to court records obtained by the DailyMail, before moving to Minneapolis in 2014, George Floyd was released from prison in Texas. He worked as a bouncer at a local restaurant.

Floyd had been sentenced to five years in prison in 2009 for aggravated assault stemming from a robbery where Floyd entered a woman’s home, pointed a gun at her stomach and searched the home for drugs and money, according to court records
Floyd had been sentenced to five years in prison in 2009 for aggravated assault stemming from a robbery where Floyd entered a woman’s home, pointed a gun at her stomach and searched the home for drugs and money, according to court records

Floyd along with another suspect posed as a worker for the local water department wearing a blue uniform in order to enter a woman’s house. When the woman retaliated a Ford Explorer pulled up to the home and five other males exited the car and went up to the front door.

The final straw for Floyd came after serving five years in prison in 2009 for aggravated assault stemming from a robbery where he entered a woman’s home, pressed a gun into her stomach and searched the home for drugs and money, according to court records (pictured)
The final straw for Floyd came after serving five years in prison in 2009 for aggravated assault stemming from a robbery where he entered a woman’s home, pressed a gun into her stomach and searched the home for drugs and money, according to court records (pictured)

The report states the largest of the group, who the victim later identified as Floyd, ‘forced his way inside the residence, placed a pistol against the complainant’s abdomen, and forced her into the living room area of the residence.

‘This large suspect then proceeded to search the residence while another armed suspect guarded the complainant, who was struck in the head and sides by this second armed suspect with his pistol while she screamed for help.’

Not finding any drugs or money at the house, the men took jewelry and the woman’s cell phone and fled in their car. A neighbor who witnessed the robbery took down the car’s license plate number.

Later, police tracked down the car and found Floyd behind the wheel. He was later identified by the woman as the large suspect who placed a gun against her stomach and forced her into her living room, the document states. 

Floyd had at least five stints in jail. In one of the charging documents, officials noted Floyd had two convictions in the 1990s for theft and delivery of a controlled substance, but it is not clear if Floyd served any time for either of those offenses
Floyd had at least five stints in jail. In one of the charging documents, officials noted Floyd had two convictions in the 1990s for theft and delivery of a controlled substance, but it is not clear if Floyd served any time for either of those offenses

Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine. Floyd had two other cocaine offenses, receiving an eight month-sentence stemming from an October 2002 arrest and was sentenced to 10 months from a 2004 arrest.

Floyd was arrested in April 2002 for criminal trespassing and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. He did another stint for theft with a firearm in August 1998. He served 10 months at Harris County jail.

In one of the charging documents, officials noted Floyd had two convictions in the 1990s for theft and delivery of a controlled substance, but it is not clear if Floyd served any time for either of those offenses.

HOW ANDREW LITTLE FAILED THE PIKE RIVER MINERS

We look back at the role of Andrew Little and the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union in the Pike River mining disaster.

 I don’t usually repost my own posts and, in fact, this is the first repost I’ve ever done. But I think it is  worth giving this story another airing given the rise in political prominence of Andrew Little. I considered rewriting the story but I think the original post speaks for itself. It outlines the role of the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) in the Pike River mining disaster, which saw 29 men lose their lives.

Labour Party leader Andrew Little was national secretary of the EPMU at the time. This story was first published on 8 November, 2012.

Last month Andrew Little went to Pike River to attend the memorial to mark the fourth anniversary of the tragedy. He told the media that he attended the commemorations to stand alongside the families.

WHEN THE  Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Pike River mining disaster issued its report  this week, the response of the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) was immediate. It issued a press statement welcoming  the  report and is encouraging the Government to implement the recommended  changes as soon as possible.

The statement quoted EPMU assistant national secretary Ged O’Connell who declared that  the report should mark a turning point for mine safety in New Zealand:

This report is a damning indictment of New Zealand’s deregulated health and safety regime. Pike River Coal Ltd should never have been allowed to operate in the way it did, and in other countries it wouldn’t have been allowed to.

The report makes clear that the tragic loss of life at Pike River could have been prevented with stronger regulations, an independent and well-resourced mine safety inspectorate and genuine worker involvement in health and safety.

We hope the failings exposed in this report spell the end of the deregulated health and safety regime of the last 20 years. This vindicates the union’s repeated calls for improvements in mine safety and for the reintroduction of check inspectors.

This statement represents a complete change of heart by the EPMU officialdom because it was never critical of  Pike River Coal (PRC) during the time that  the mine was open. The EPMU represented approximately half of the 140 miners on the site.

After the first explosion the EPMU strongly defended the management of PRC.

EPMU National secretary Andrew Little (now a Labour MP)  told the New Zealand Herald on November 22  2010 that  there was “nothing unusual about Pike River or this mine that we’ve been particularly concerned about”.

He then appeared on TVNZ’s  Close Up  to again defend PRC management.

He told Close Up that underground mining was inherently unsafe and the risk of gas explosions, particularly on the West Coast, was high.

While the industry was aware of the risks and took the necessary precautions, unfortunately these kinds of incidents still happened, he argued.

On November 26, 2010 the Dominion Post  ran an article that denounced ‘wild’ rumours that the mine was not safe. It declared  that  “Any suggestion of obvious or known safety lapses does not find traction with unionised staff or union leader Andrew Little.”

Andrew Little’s conciliatory views toward  PRC management were echoed by Labour MP Damien O’Connor. He suggested that no one was responsible for the accident and that the  disaster was “just one of these things that the West Coast unfortunately has had to get used to over the years”.

Little and O’Connor’s views would of found  favour with the Minister for Energy and Resources, Gerry Brownlee. He insisted that PRC had “an absolute focus on health and safety”.

So here  we had the Government, the Labour Party and the EPMU all lining up to defend the management of PRC.

At the  time this writer commented: “All workers at the mining site should be seriously concerned that the EPMU has such a benevolent view of its safety standards.”

The views of Andrew Little and the EPMU flew in the face of expert opinion.

While Andrew Little  was defending PRC an Australian gas drainage engineer, who wished to remain anonymous because he feared ‘recriminations’, said he visited Pike River in 2009  and observed that its  operating standards were “extremely poor”.

He said  that he had been told by miners  that the mine was flooded with methane gas about three weeks before the first explosion.

He said  miners had bored through ‘high flow methane holes’ without any risk assessment conducted or procedure on how to manage gas flow from the hole in place. He was critical  that PRC has not yet implemented a gas drainage drilling regime that could relieve the pressure when there was  a  build up of gas by drilling a hole in the coal seam.

The New Zealand Herald, also in November 2010,  quoted Gerry Morris of Greymouth, a former writer for Coal magazine, who said he had heard regularly from contractors at the mine “over the last two or three years that this mine is unsafe, there’s far too much gas, there’s going to be a disaster here one day”.

But despite the overwhelming evidence that there was  something seriously and dangerously wrong at the Pike Rive mine, the officials of the  EPMU did nothing.

The mine opened in November 2008  and on not one occasion did the EPMU  initiate industrial action or even criticise PRC’S  safety standards, even after a group of workers  walked off the job to protest the lack of basic emergency equipment.

The walk out by miners was revealed by miner  Brent Forrester. He told TVNZ’s Sunday on December 5 2010 that  he once helped organise a walkout of about 10 miners to protest the lack of basic emergency equipment, including stretchers and an emergency transport vehicle. They received no support from the EPMU. Andrew Little  even insisted that  PRC “had a good health and safety committee that’s been very active.”

It was exactly this benevolent attitude  by the EPMU that allowed PRC – and the Department of Labour – to continue as if it was just ‘business a usual’. It appears that no-one was  protecting the interests and concerns of the workers on the mining site. The EMPU failed to organise industrial action  to address safety concerns  at the  mine in favour of  ‘cooperating’ with management, what it and the CTU sometimes  refer to as ‘modern unionism’.

There won’t be any resignations from within the EPMU for dereliction of duty and, of course, Andrew Little  has escaped to Parliament.

Well I believe

White Lives Matter

Males Lives Matter

Females Lives Matter

All Lives Matter

And saying All Lives Matter is NOT a denial that there is a problem.

Biggest problem is a LACK of RESPECT for the Police.

Oh SO Funny

Image may contain: food

While shopping earlier today,I picked up some chicken legs.Just before the young lady rang them up, I asked if she knew whether they were front or back legs. She paused for a moment,read everything she could on the package and not finding the answer said; “I don’t know. Let me go ask my manager”. She came back a few minutes later ,looked at me.and said, NOT FUNNY!! I said, I’m sorry but I thought it was. The guy behind me laughing hysterically blurted out…..NOT FUNNY, IT WAS HILARIOUS. Have a great weekend 😄 😄